Buyback Tip Shops

MAMS operates Buyback Tip Shops at Cardwell, Tully, Mission Beach and Stoters Hill Transfer Stations


Items for sale at all MAMS Buyback Tip Shops include (but are not limited to):-

  • Bikes & Toys
  • Books
  • Bric-a-brac
  • Building Materials
  • Clothing & Accessories
  • Electrical Goods
  • Fishing Gear
  • Household Furniture
  • Hardware Goods
  • Nursery Items
  • Plants
  • Sporting Equipment

MAMS ALIGNMENT WITH THE QLD WASTE REDUCTION STRATEGY

This internationally recognised framework for managing waste generation and disposal describes the preferred order for managing wastes and resources. The hierarchy places waste reduction as the preferred option, followed by reuse, through recycling and recovery options to disposal as the least preferred approach.

Based on these principles, MAMS broad strategy goal is to optimise: Reduce, Reuse and Recycle.

Reduce

The MAMS Group is committed to reducing waste generated within our company operations as follows:-

  1. Recycling paper and plastic at our offices
  2. Recycling oil, scrap steel, cardboard, batteries in our workshops
  3. Recycling cardboard, plastic, batteries, oil, scrap steel, aluminium, copper at Cassowary Coast Transfer Stations
  4. Recovering reusable items at all Cassowary Coast Transfer Stations for resale at our Buyback Tip Shops

Reuse

The MAMS Group recovers reusable items at all Cassowary Coast Transfer Stations for resale at our Buyback Tip Shops at Cardwell, Tully, Mission Beach and Stoters Hill Transfer Stations. By doing this we provide an opportunity for the Cassowary Coast Community to purchase reusable items that would normally be discarded into landfill.

Buyback Tip Shops have both environmental and economical benefits to the community because they not only divert waste from landfill but the community is able to purchase low cost reusable items.

Recycle

The MAMS Group Cassowary Coast Transfer Stations currently provides the community with the ability to recycle cardboard, plastic, aluminium cans, batteries, gas bottles and waste oil.

To improve productivity and efficiencies at all Transfer Station site, MAMS degasses airconditioners, fridges, freezers and cars, as well as salvages copper from the airconditioners and fridges.

BENEFITS

  • 95 percent less energy is needed to make aluminium from used cans than from the raw material, bauxite
  • Every aluminium can that is recycled saves enough electricity to light a 20-watt energy-efficient bulb for 17.5 hours, or a TV for three hours
  • The energy saved from recycling one glass bottle is enough to light a 20-watt energy-efficient bulb for 20 hours
  • It also reduces air pollution by 20% and water pollution by 50%
  • Recycling one tonne of glass saves 1.1 tonnes of raw materials (sand, limestone, soda ash and reduces energy use by 30%
  • Adding used steel to new steel production reduces energy use by 25%, air pollution by almost 90%, water pollution by 76%, mining wastes by 97% and water usage by 40%

FOREWARD - From the Queensland Waste Management Strategy

Queensland is one of the largest generators of waste in Australia. 

We produce more than 32 million tonnes of waste every single year, which is the highest amount of waste per capita of any state.

We all produce waste in our daily lives, and every year as our population increases, so does our waste generation. This situation has serious long-term environmental, social and economic implications for the state. We lose industry investment, job opportunities and regional market growth - while creating greenhouse gases and wasting valuable and often non-renewable resources.

Considerable work is currently underway nationally to address waste and increase resource recovery.

I quote The Honourable Kate Jones MP Minister for Climate Change and Sustainability.

We all strive for a waste management system where recycling is the first option over landfill and more unwanted materials are given a new life by someone else. We want more trash to become someone else's treasure.

The Queensland Waste Reduction and Recycling Strategy is underpinned by the Waste and Resource Management Hierarchy. This is an internationally recognised framework for managing waste generation and disposal describes the preferred order for managing wastes and resources.

The hierarchy places waste reduction as the preferred option, followed by reuse, through recycling and recovery options to disposal as the least preferred approach. Waste is an inefficient use of natural resources, water, energy, money and land.

Waste Production has the following impacts:

  • Environmental Impacts: Even disposal of wastes into well-designed and managed landfills can create environmental impacts, from transporting the waste for disposal, to potential leachate, odour and greenhouse gas emission impacts
  • Social Impacts: Puts pressure on local councils to find suitable sites for new disposal facilities that won't impact on nearby land uses, such as residential areas, which is increasingly difficult and expensive, leading to higher costs for ratepayers
  • Economic Impacts: Queensland is losing valuable investment and job creation opportunities in the resource recovery sector to other states where there are clear incentives to reuse and recycle.

As Queensland's population grows and standards of living increases, more goods are consumed and more waste is produced. For households, waste management charges appear as a fixed amount on rates notices. In most cases, the charge is the same, regardless of how much or little waste the householder generates.

This means there is no immediate impertavie or incentive to take action and avoid generating waste, reduce the amount of waste discarded or even to recycle more effectively.